Making of A Wish

BTS of 2 wishes I just granted at MILK Studios, 

the video was played at the annual "Power Of A Wish" Gala 2016

Ashley's Wish

Ashley's Wish I granted with my amazing team with Make-A-Wish Massachusetts and Rhode Island

We all have the power to grant a wish please go to www.wish.org to learn more how you can make a difference in a child's life

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The 55th Steel Pen of “Project Leopard"

The Leopard-Human conflict is a real issue, which is serious in rural communities living in the area around Yala National Park. A Decrease in habitat and wild prey has increased the number of leopards’ intrusions in attacking domesticated animals, close to villages, outside the boundaries of the national parks, and protected areas

Recent studies show that the Yala National Park, in Southern Sri Lanka supports one of the highest densities of leopard in the world. The growing population of leopards at Yala has led to leopards venturing out of the park to the surrounding buffer zone of agriculture and pastoral land and feeding on cattle, prompting revenge attacks that claim an estimated 10–12 leopard lives annually around the periphery of the park. The means adopted is a simple but effective solution of making steel pens to herd the cattle calves in place of traditional weak stick and barbed wire pens used by village herders as per a concept developed by wildlife enthusiasts, the late Dr. Ravi Samarasinghe, Shirom Kulatunge and Darrel Bartholomeusz, members of the Wildlife and Nature Protection Society.

Mitigating the human-leopard conflict in the villages adjacent to Yala National Park through the provision of portable steel-fenced pens to herd domestic cattle.

I was delighted to donate as a guest of Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts the 55th pen since the inception of the project. While there have been no reported killings of cattle belonging to farmers who have benefited from steels pens, over 60 leopards are estimated to have been saved since project inception in 2010 upto July 2015.

CNN Impact your life

Impact Your Life

Interview about the great work performed by EGPAF and my involvement with the foundation

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CNN Impact your life

I first became involved with the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) five years ago, when I traveled to Tanzania to take photographs and film a documentary about EGPAF's work in Africa.

Today, I continue to be inspired by the mothers, health workers, volunteers and government officials I met during my travels who remain dedicated to stopping this deadly virus from infecting another generation.

Nigel Barker trying to convince the local medicine man on the Maasai Steppe to let him speak to women in the tribe who deliver the babies.

But more than an inspiration, my trip to Tanzania was an education. I learned that not only is pediatric HIV almost 100% preventable, but that we have tools available to achieve an AIDS-free generation within this lifetime. By giving an HIV-positive pregnant woman access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) during pregnancy and breastfeeding, we can almost ensure that her baby will be born and remain HIV-free.

Photographing the Maasai, an African nomadic tribes people who have been heavily hit by HIV/AIDS.

Sadly, many of the women and children who need these crucial services still don't receive them. According to the 2013 UNAIDS Global Report, 700 children are infected with HIV every day. Most contract the virus from their mothers during pregnancy, childbirth or breastfeeding. And only one third of those children currently have access to the medications that will help them remain healthy.

Another UNAIDS report from 2012 says without ART, half of all HIV-positive children won't live past the age of 2 and 80% of them will die before their 5th birthday.

While these numbers are staggering, so is progress that has been made since Elizabeth Glaser first started her fight to help children with pediatric HIV more than 25 years ago.

Pediatric HIV has been virtually eliminated in the United States and Europe and thanks to programs such as the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), we are closer than ever before to ending pediatric HIV in Africa and other resource-limited regions around the world.

We can see evidence of PEPFAR's positive impact firsthand in stories like that of Tatu Msangi, a woman I met during my trip to Tanzania.

Tatu Msangi, who is HIV-positive, works on homework with virus-free daughter Faith.

Tatu discovered she was HIV-positive after becoming pregnant with her daughter, Faith, in 2004 -- when HIV/AIDS was killing millions of people each year and resources to treat and prevent the virus in Africa were very limited.

But, thanks to PEPFAR, Tatu received the medicine she needed to prevent transmitting HIV to her child.

Today, almost 10 years later, Faith is happy, healthy and HIV-negative. Tatu was so inspired by PEPFAR and EGPAF's work to help HIV-positive mothers and their children that she went back to school to become a nurse and now works at a clinic in Kilimanjaro.

This past June, Tatu and Faith joined U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Washington, DC to celebrate the fact that since PEPFAR began in 2003, 1 million babies, just like Faith, have been born HIV-free.

Preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV is the first step toward achieving an AIDS-free generation.

I encourage everyone to take a few moments out of your day to learn more about the fight for an AIDS-free future. Tweet, post to Facebook, or even just talk to someone you know about pediatric HIV and what each of us can do to make sure that this generation is the last one to face this devastating epidemic.

One World Interview with Deepak Chopra

In an intimate conversation

Watch my conversation with Deepak on the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation at NEWSWIRE.FM

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Huff Post letter for World AIDS DAY

A Generation of Hope, But Not Yet a Generation Free

As a photographer, I have traveled to some of the most exotic and beautiful places in the world. One of my most memorable and inspirational trips did not include any designer clothes or fashion models -- but it did feature a lot of hope. A few years ago, I took a trip to Tanzania to take pictures and film a documentary for the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF). There, I met health workers, volunteers, government officials, and mothers who were working together to achieve a common goal -- prevent HIV-positive women from transmitting the virus to their babies. The dedication and passion of the people I met in Tanzania continues to inspire me and my work today.

And on World AIDS Day in particular, I am struck by how much progress has been made to fight the epidemic in recent years, especially in children. When Elizabeth Glaser first started her foundation with her two best friends in 1988, little was known about how HIV/AIDS infects children and there were no medications available to specifically treat pediatric patients. Now, 25 years later, pediatric HIV/AIDS is virtually eliminated in the United States, due in large part to advocates like Elizabeth, who were not afraid to speak out for the disease's most vulnerable victims.

I am proud to continue Elizabeth's legacy as I work with EGPAF to help achieve the same results in developing countries around the world. Every day 700 babies are born HIV-positive and almost all of them live in sub-Saharan Africa where the disease remains an epidemic. In Tanzania alone, 1.4 million people are living with HIV and 10 to 14 percent of them are children. More than 90 percent of these children contracted the virus from their mothers either during her pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding.

While these numbers are staggering, the people I met in Tanzania did not seem defeated. In fact, many of them, including HIV-positive mothers like Tatu Msangi, were full of hope. Tatu discovered she was HIV-positive after becoming pregnant with her daughter, Faith, in 2004 -- when HIV/AIDS was killing millions of people each year in Tanzania and resources to treat and prevent the virus were very limited. However, thanks to a new program at the time, called the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), Tatu received the medicine she needed to prevent transmitting HIV to her child. Today, almost 10 years later, Faith is happy, healthy, and HIV-negative. Tatu was so inspired by PEPFAR and EGPAF's work to help HIV-positive mothers and their children that she went back to school to become a nurse and she now works at a clinic in Kilimanjaro. And this past June, Tatu and Faith joined U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Washington, D.C. to celebrate the fact that since PEPFAR began in 2003, 1 million babies, just like Faith, have been born HIV-free.

My goal is to return to Tanzania and visit these amazing people and clinics again. But next time I want to tell more than a story of hope through photographs -- I want to tell a story of success. Preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV is the first step toward achieving an AIDS-free generation and thanks to organizations like EGPAF, I know that this goal can be achieved.

I will rely on all of you to help bring this goal a little bit closer to reality. Tweet, post toFacebook, or even just talk to someone you know about pediatric HIV/AIDS and what each of us can do to make sure that this generation is the last one to face this devastating epidemic.

Add your voice to the worldwide roar for an #AIDSFreeGen by joining EGPAF's World AIDS Day Thunderclap.

Pics For Pets

Animal Photography Tips with Nigel Barker

For more go to www.dosomething.org

Girl Up

Girl Up is an innovative campaign of the United Nations Foundation. We give American girls the opportunity to become global leaders and channel their energy and compassion to raise awareness and funds for United Nations programs that help some of the world’s hardest-to-reach adolescent girls.

Girl Up envisions a world where all girls, no matter where they live, have the opportunity to become educated, healthy, safe, counted and positioned to be the next generation of leaders.

For more ways to get involved visit www.girlup.org

Fashion's Night Out FTBC

What better way to start off Fashion Week and Fashion’s Night Out than supporting an amazing cause… Which of course is FTBC (Fashion Targets Breast Cancer), the charitable initiative of the CFDA (Council Of Fashion Designers of America). This year I was at the Nine West flag ship store at the Rockefeller Plaza in support of the innovative advertizing campaign I shot for Nine West called Runway Relief. The campaign once again featured the hip military inspired black boot that retails for $199.00 with all the proceeds benefiting FTBC. I shot Carolyn Murphy, Chrissy Teigen and about 30 more charitable models who all donated their time and loveliness to Step For A Cause! As well as that Nine West and Modelinia joined forces allowing you the customer to sponsor the models during Fashion Week… They did this by customizing the NW boots each model was given to wear during Fashion Week with a pedometer made by Fit Bit which calculates and keeps track of the number of steps the girls take during the week. The number of steps translates to a dollar amount donated by Nine West and also by you if you choose to sponsor a role model 
We also created an iTunes CD with fabulous artists like Chrissy Teigen’s boyfriend John Legend, Train and Katy B….. Nine West also created a T-shirt and a Tote bag with proceeds benefiting FTBC as well so there’s no reason not to get involved..

 

 

So For Fashion’s Night Out (FNO) Chrissy Teigen and several other lovely models posed for photos taken by me with Bloggers and customers who purchased the boots and other Merchandise. The event started at 8 am with a bloggers breakfast and went late into the night where wrapped the evening off with a DJ and even a fire drill… We are happy to announce that this has been the mot successful FNO for Nine West and the boot is currently the top selling item in Nine West stores across the country!!! To kick the night off NW organized a Flash Mob of over 100 dancers who broke it down outside the store.

 

During the night The Make A Wish Foundation also stopped by with Rachel, whose wish was to experience Fashion Week. I also caught up with Rachel at the Academy Of The Arts University Fashion show just last night. For me there is nothing better than when all areas of the fashion business come together to give back. In a world in need, it’s important for us all to make a difference by either donating, volunteering, advocating or at the very least gaining an education of the issues at hand.